Single Leg Squatting: Stability and Flexibility

Progression 1/3: Single Leg Balancing Squat Supported Everyday, people engage in movements that involve coordination of the ankle, knee and hip joints (AKH). Movements such as walking, running, and jumping are variations of the Single Leg Squatting position. In order for coordinated execution of these movements to take place, proper engagement of the core and … Continue reading Single Leg Squatting: Stability and Flexibility

Functional Exercises for Golf

Hip Extension with Feet on the Stability Ball Hip stability is a very important aspect of movement. No matter what you want to engage in, be it walking, running, tai chi, tennis, or swimming. Specifically, hip stability plays a key part in the mechanics of golf. The stability of your hips comes from good core … Continue reading Functional Exercises for Golf

30 minutes and I’m gone . . . .

So you have only 30 minutes to workout? What can you accomplish in 30 minutes? When structured properly, you can achieve an effective workout in just 30 minutes. Due to time constraints, exercise usually gets put aside until the next day. If this happens often enough, accountability may begin to wane and exercise may be … Continue reading 30 minutes and I’m gone . . . .

Martial Arts Kata and Core Stability

I was practicing my tai chi long form on 4 April 2012. Lately, I have been focusing keeping the head suspended while lengthening the spine and sinking into the ground. I have been emphasizing these points by practicing the form with a book on my head. Practicing the form in this fashion encourages activation of … Continue reading Martial Arts Kata and Core Stability

Tell me More About the Core

The core is the lumbo-pelvic-hip complex, thoracic and cervical spine. It is where the body's center of gravity is located and where all movement begins. The major muscles of the core are the diaphragm, pelvic floor muscles, multifidus, rectus abdominis, transversus abdominis, internal and external obliques, erector spinae, latissimus dorsi, gluteus maximus, and the trapezius. … Continue reading Tell me More About the Core