ROM . . . Get a move on

Range of motion (ROM) is an important quality of human physical functioning. Adequate ROM enables the body to perform various tasks without restrictions (in movement). An active lifestyle does not, in itself, denote good range of motion, Repetitive movements become set patterns within the neuro-musculo-tendonous matrix. This dynamic facilitates decreased ROM over time and can become problematic with age. ROM can be maintained by taking joints through a full arc of movement once a day. Human function can endure as one ages.

The body is designed for movement. The capability to maneuver within and manipulate the surrounding environment is due largely to ROM. The ability to move provides one with options as to how they will interact with their environment. The body must squat to pick things up or to be relieved of waste. The body must reach to  grab things and to subsequently pull them back. Twisting, bending, lifting (overhead) . . . . all of these movements require degrees of movement which, when combined, give the body full maneuverability.

Functional joint movement is key to performing physical tasks. To lift a heavy load from the floor requires good ROM (flexibility and mobility) in the hips and core  stabilization. Lifting from the floor requires core engagement to stabilize the hips and the back during the lift. Controlled lifting of something overhead that is not evenly weighted. Shoveling dirt and putting  over to the side. Core engagement, Shoulder and elbow ROM and rotational stability are key to performing these and other tasks.

The situation with humans is that they (tend to) become situated within prescribed patterns of movement. Activities for some people are the same, day in, day out. The body adjusts accordingly to the extent of the movements that are placed upon it. So, the body adjusts to sitting all day if that is the extent of one’s movement. Physical activities that do not move the joints through the full arco f movement set the stage for limited movement. Not extending to one’s full capability facilitates the joints adjusting to the current extents in ROM.   

In addition, age presents the body with added challenges to full ROM.  Research studies reveal that ROM is greater at younger ages. It has been shown to diminish over time, with age. The lessening of movement is prevalent within the aging population. ROM decreases as amounts and degrees of movement decreases. Yet, the body is designed for movement. Age need not be a predisposition for reduced quality of movement. The aging body can be as supple, relatively, as that of a (much) younger person. Persistence in engaging “quality of movement”, over time, will provide great benefit to the aging individual.

Flowing
Moving like a gentle wind, crashing like a rouge wave.

Functional ROM is critical for living in the world. A body must functionally navigate and interact with the surrounding environment. A body free of restrictions performs various tasks. One’s choice of activity may be a limiting factor for their full ROM. The degree to which ROM decreases with age in the ‘average’ person can cause life difficulties; however, maintaining patterns of quality movement will provide one

Reference Values for Normal Joint Range of Motion

The following table provides the reference values along with 95% confidence intervals for normal range of motion for 11 measurements taken on 5 joints. Values are provided separately by sex and age.

https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/jointrom/index.html

Reference Values for Normal Joint Range of Motion
Age 2–8
MotionFemalesMales
Hip extension26.2 (23.9 – 28.5)28.3 (27.2 – 29.4)
Hip flexion140.8 (139.2 – 142.4)131.1 (129.4 – 132.8)
Knee flexion152.6 (151.2 – 154.0)147.8 (146.6 – 149.0)
Knee extension5.4 (3.9 – 6.9)1.6 (0.9 – 2.3)
Ankle dorsiflexion24.8 (22.5 – 27.1)22.8 (21.3 – 24.3)
Ankle plantar flexion67.1 (64.8 – 69.4)55.8 (54.4 – 57.2)
Shoulder flexion178.6 (176.9 – 180.3)177.8 (176.7 – 178.9)
Elbow flexion152.9 (151.5 – 154.3)151.4 (150.8 – 152.0)
Elbow extension6.8 (5.2 – 8.4)2.2 (0.9 – 3.5)
Elbow pronation84.6 (82.8 – 86.4)79.6 (78.8 – 80.4)
Elbow supination93.7 (91.4 – 96.0)86.4 (85.3 – 87.5)
Age 9–19
MotionFemalesMales
Hip extension20.5 (18.6 – 22.4)18.2 (16.6 – 19.8)
Hip flexion134.9 (133.0 – 136.8)135.2 (133.0 – 137.4)
Knee flexion142.3 (140.8 – 143.8)142.2 (140.4 – 144.0)
Knee extension2.4 (1.5 – 3.3)1.8 (0.9 – 2.7)
Ankle dorsiflexion17.3 (15.6 – 19.0)16.3 (14.9 – 17.7)
Ankle plantar flexion57.3 (54.8 – 59.8)52.8 (50.8 – 54.8)
Shoulder flexion171.8 (169.8 – 173.8)170.9 (169.1 – 172.7)
Elbow flexion149.7 (148.5 – 150.9)148.3 (146.8 – 149.8)
Elbow extension6.4 (4.7 – 8.1)5.3 (3.6 – 7.0)
Elbow pronation81.2 (79.6 – 82.8)79.8 (77.8 – 81.8)
Elbow supination90.0 (88.0 – 92.0)87.8 (85.7 – 89.9)
Age 20–44
MotionFemalesMales
Hip extension18.1 (17.0 – 19.2)17.4 (16.3 – 18.5)
Hip flexion133.8 (132.5 – 135.1)130.4 (129.0 – 131.8)
Knee flexion141.9 (140.9 – 142.9)137.7 (136.5 – 138.9)
Knee extension1.6 (1.1 – 2.1)1.0 (0.6 – 1.4)
Ankle dorsiflexion13.8 (12.9 – 14.7)12.7 (11.6 – 13.8)
Ankle plantar flexion62.1 (60.6 – 63.6)54.6 (53.2 – 56.0)
Shoulder flexion172.0 (170.9 – 173.1)168.8 (167.3 – 170.3)
Elbow flexion150.0 (149.1 – 150.9)144.6 (143.6 – 145.6)
Elbow extension4.7 (3.9 – 5.5)0.8 (0.1 – 1.5)
Elbow pronation82.0 (81.0 – 83.0)76.9 (75.6 – 78.2)
Elbow supination90.6 (89.2 – 92.0)85.0 (83.8 – 86.2)
Age 45–69
MotionFemalesMales
Hip extension16.7 (15.5 – 17.9)13.5 (12.5 – 14.5)
Hip flexion130.8 (129.2 – 132.4)127.2 (125.7 – 128.7)
Knee flexion137.8 (136.5 – 139.1)132.9 (131.6 – 134.2)
Knee extension1.2 (0.7 – 1.7)0.5 (0.1 – 0.9)
Ankle dorsiflexion11.6 (10.6 – 12.6)11.9 (10.9 – 12.9)
Ankle plantar flexion56.5 (55.0 – 58.0)49.4 (47.7 – 51.1)
Shoulder flexion168.1 (166.7 – 169.5)164.0 (162.3 – 165.7)
Elbow flexion148.3 (147.3 – 149.3)143.5 (142.3 – 144.7)
Elbow extension3.6 (2.6 – 4.6)-0.7 (-1.5 – 0.1)
Elbow pronation80.8 (79.7 – 81.9)77.7 (76.5 – 78.9)
Elbow supination87.2 (86.0 – 88.4)82.4 (80.9 – 83.9)

 

To develop programming for improving or maintaining good ROM contact the trainers at Ab-Sutra Wellness and Fitness

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